Emergency: 1 (800) 282-4916

Pipeline Emergencies

Pipeline leaks are rare, but being able to recognize and respond to a suspected leak or rupture is an important part of living and working safely around underground pipelines. Your personal safety should be your first concern should you encounter any of these signs or conditions.

Signs of a natural gas pipeline rupture:

  • Loud roaring or explosive sound; OR
  • Very large flames and loud roaring nose.

Follow these steps:

If there are no flames present:

  • Immediately evacuate the area;
  • Do not start or turn off motor vehicles or electrical equipment such as cell phones; pagers, two-way radios or lights as this could cause the gas to ignite;
  • Abandon any equipment being used in or near the area;
  • Move far enough away from the noise until you can have a normal conversation;
  • Discourage others from entering the area;
  • From this safe location, call 911 or contact the local fire department or law enforcement office; and
  • Notify the operator of the pipeline.

If flames are present:

  • Move behind a structure that provides protection until there is a reduction in noise;
  • Plan a route away from the fire that offers shelter;
  • Driving away from the area is acceptable;
  • Move far enough away from the flames until you feel comfortable;
  • Discourage others from entering the area;
  • From this safe location, call 911 or contact the local fire department or law enforcement office; and
  • Notify the operator of the pipeline.

Signs of a natural gas pipeline leak:

  • Whistling or hissing sound;
  • Distinctive, strong odor, often compared to rotten eggs;
  • Dense fog, mist or white cloud;
  • Bubbling in water, ponds or creeks;
  • Dust or dirt blowing up from the ground; or
  • Discolored or dead vegetation above the pipeline right of way.

Follow these steps:

  • Carefully evacuate the immediate area to where you can no longer hear, see or smell the gas;
  • Avoid introducing any sources of ignition in the area;
  • Do not start or turn off motor vehicles or electrical equipment such as cell phones, pagers, two-way radios or lights, as this could cause a spark;
  • Abandon any equipment being used in or near the area;
  • Avoid any open flames;
  • Discourage others from entering the area;
  • Call 911 or contact the local fire department or law enforcement from a safe location; and
  • Notify the operator of the pipeline.

Two important things to remember:

  • Do not attempt to extinguish a natural gas fire; and
  • Do not attempt to operate any pipeline valves or equipment.

Warning Pipeline sign

Call Before You Dig

MoGas actively supports the national Call Before You Dig initiative which encourages consumers anywhere in the country to call 811. Your call will be routed to a local One Call Center.

When you call: Tell the operator where you’re planning to dig and what types of work you will be doing. Your affected local utilities companies will then be notified about your intent to dig. Within a few days they will send you a technician to mark the approximate location of your underground lines, pipes and cables so you’ll know what’s below – and be able to dig safely.

Remember: Always call 811 before you start any digging project. You’ll avoid injury, expense and embarrassment … and a very inconvenient day in the dark!

Missouri One Call System (MOCS)
1-800-DIG-RITE

Illinois One Call System (JULIE)
1-800-892-0123